Pros and cons of going indie

The ups and downs of indie publishing…  From creative control to the ‘big marketing problem’  What motivates/de-motivates our indie authors?
 

Eric Diehl

🙂

“the immediacy of the process”

“the increased level of control”

“pricing. Not only do I garner a larger percentage of the sales price as the author’s share, but with some exceptions I can set and/or change the pricing any way I see fit.”

😦

“the lingering stigma attached to self-published works”

John Porter

🙂

“The freedom”..”I sink or swim on the merits of what I do.”

“it’s soooo good to get reader’s feedback.”

😦

“I don’t like seeing the thousands of samples being downloaded, and only a comparatively small percentage being converted into actual sales.”

Brandon Luffman

🙂

“we’re seeing the early stages of this new revolution, where anyone who has a story to tell can get their work out there.”

“Now the reader can decide if an author’s work is worth reading or not – which is how it should be.”

😦

“the stereotype of indie authors: Poorly proofread, unedited, and of questionable talent.”

“it’s up to us, the readers, to pick through the sea of writing that is out there to find what is good. But, I still think it’s worth it – absolutely so! – because I have discovered authors who I know would never have been picked up by traditional publishers, but who do great work.”

Tina Glasneck

🙂

“my favorite part of indie publishing would be the cover creation.”

😦

“Keeping track of numbers and sales”

“No one wants to be the person saying, “Buy my book,” and come across as a used car salesman.”

MR Cornelius

🙂

“not losing creative control of my work.”

😦

“the marketing”

Deborah J Hughes

🙂

“Hearing back from readers!”

😦

“Marketing! It’s very, very challenging and time consuming to get the word out about my book.”

Anthea Carson

🙂

“The independence of course.”…”If I followed the scripts of the publishing world I would gag on my word processor.”

“I get to pick out my own book cover and set my own price.”

😦

“When you are totally indie you answer for yourself. You say, “Hey buddy, I thought it was good enough. And that was good enough for me.””

R Stephenson

🙂

“Promotion. No one is more enthusiastic about promoting my work than me.”

😦

“Editing. I thought I had a grasp on the rules of grammar. Turns out I’m a bit rusty.”

Rosemary Lynch

🙂

“Seeing your story come to life and holding your book in your hands for the first time ~ it’s a magical moment”

😦

“Advertising! Not very good at the publicity side of it all, but learning new avenues every day.”

J. Naomi Ay

🙂

“It’s fast and easy and I control it.”

😦

“The marketing. It’s a big pond but right now it’s overflowing with fish.”

Melissa Love

🙂

“Choosing my own writing style and if I want to add or change any part of the book, I don’t have to go through a third party.”

Jeremy Laszlo

🙂

“the learning process has been my favorite part,”

“hearing from all of my fans”

😦

“the anxiousness and uncertainty that comes with each new book I publish.”

Darlene Jones

🙂

“Having control over everything and being able to do it all on my timeline.”

😦

“The marketing. It’s time consuming and I feel like I’m batting people over the head trying to get them to buy my book.”

Whitney Moore

🙂

“not having anyone tell me that I can’t do something within the process. Since I have a degree in graphic design, cover art and interior layouts are important to me.”

“I like being able to write and publish absolutely any idea you could ever have and seeing if there is an audience for it rather than someone telling you the ‘rules of fiction’ and saying there is no market before it’s even been tried.”

Larissa Hinton

🙂

“the ability to make major decisions. I get to decide where, when and how I will publish my books.”

“I can write in whatever genre I wish.”

😦

“all of (the) publishing business detracts from the writing process.”

Elizabeth Baxter

🙂

“I just love the whole process.” “My most favorite part is probably when I’ve got all the proofs back, the cover finished and I can start putting the file together ready for publishing.”

😦

“Fiddling with file when I should be leaving it alone!”

Sarka-Jonae Miller

🙂

“creative control.” “Even if I signed a deal with a major publishing house in the future I would be in a better bargaining position having gone the indie route first and gaining some success on my own.”

😦

“It takes a lot more time to get people to hear about your book”

“so many people won’t even consider self-published books or books published by small publishers for reviews or awards.”

David Berger

🙂

“The control”

😦

“Marketing. I’m an introvert, so putting myself out there into the world and drawing attention isn’t my normal place to be.”

Deanna Lynn Sletten

🙂

“having total control over everything from the writing of the book to the editing and formatting”

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About indie e-books

http://indieebooks.co.uk is aimed at providing a common platform for indie writers and publishers to show-case their work. The content is kept limited to one (free) short story per author to give the reader an idea of the writing style and talent involved and to help forward them on to more substantial work.
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